Musical Intervals Chart – Chord Types

Below you can find the most popular chord types and what intervals they’re made up of.

Musical Intervals Chart

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Abbreviations

If not all the abbreviations are clear, here is an explaining list of all the abbreviations:

  • Maj. 3rd: Major third
  • Min. 3rd: Minor third
  • Maj. 2nd: Major second
  • Maj. 7th: Major seventh
  • Min. 7th: Minor seventh
  • Perf. 4th: Perfect fourth
  • Perf. 5th: Perfect fifth
  • Dim. 5th: Diminished fifth
  • Aug. 5th: Augmented fifth

Chart explained

The chart shows all the semitones of the chromatic scale and where the intervals of the chords can be found. A chromatic scale contains all twelve notes that exist in Western music.

These are the twelve notes:

C – C# – D – D# – E – F – F# – G – G# – A – A# – B

The easiest way to use the chart is to fill in those 12 notes over the twelve columns, as I will show you below.

Sometimes I will change the note from a sharp to a flat. This is because notes can have more than one Musical Intervals Chart name:

  • C# is also a Db.
  • D# is also an Eb
  • F# is also a Gb
  • G# is also an Ab
  • A# is also a Bb.

These notes sound exactly the same, but for notation purposes, it’s important to refer to the right note.

When in doubt, look the major note (seconds, thirds, sixths, sevenths).

  • When the major third of a chord is E, the minor third will be Eb, not D#.
  • When the major seventh of a chord is B, the minor seventh will be Bb, not A#.

If there’s no major note, look at the perfect note (fourths, fifths).

  • When the perfect fifth of a chord is G, the diminished fifth will be Gb, not F#.

Major & Minor Chords

Major and minor chords are the most common type of chords. They’re usually the type of chords that you learn first.

Major

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Major third: E
  • Perfect fifth: G

Minor

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Minor third: D#, but we use Eb
  • Perfect fifth: G

Power Chords

Power chords are most often used in rock and metal. They exist of only two notes: roots and fifths.

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Perfect fifth: G

Major & Minor Seventh Chords

Major and minor seventh chords are major and major chords with an added major or minor seventh. They’re very popular in jazz and blues.

Major Seventh

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Major third: E
  • Perfect fifth: G
  • Major seventh: B

Minor Seventh

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Minor third: D#, but we use Eb
  • Perfect fifth: G
  • Minor seventh: A#, but we use Bb

Dominant Seventh Chords

I like to call dominant seventh chords “blues chords”. They have a major third but unlike the major seventh chord, it does not have a major seventh but a minor seventh.

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Major third: E
  • Perfect fifth: G
  • Minor seventh: A#, but we use Bb

Diminished & Half Diminished Chords

Diminished and half diminished chords are chords that don’t have a perfect fifth. Its fifth is a semitone lower. That’s why they call it diminished. Diminished and half diminished chords always have a minor third.

Diminished

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Minor third: D#, but we call use Eb
  • Diminished fifth: F#, but we use Gb

Half Diminished

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Minor third: D#, but we call use Eb
  • Diminished fifth: F#, but we use Gb
  • Diminished seventh: A, but we use Bbb

Augmented Chords

Just like diminished chords, augmented chords don’t have a perfect fifth. Its fifth is a semitone higher. Augmented chords always have a major third.

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Major third: E
  • Augmented Fifth: G#

Suspended chords

Suspended chords usually don’t have a third. Instead, they have a major second or a perfect fourth.

Suspended Second

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Major second: D
  • Perfect fifth: G

Suspended Fourth

Musical Intervals Chart - Chord Types

Intervals:

  • Root: C
  • Perfect fourth: F
  • Perfect fifth: G

Outro

If you want to this with a note other than C, just make sure that note is the first in line and fill in the other notes in order of the chromatic scale as I did above. If you’d want to do this with G, fill in the notes like this:

G – G# – A – A# – B – C – C# – D – D# – E – F – F#

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them below. I will be here to answer them.

Happy strumming,

Timo

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